5 Reasons to Work Out With Your Partner

Training as a couple is healthy, time-efficient and good for your relationship mojo.

By Jenessa Connor | September 29, 2016

Couples who work out together are on to something. Partner exercises not only add variety to training sessions but also can strengthen a couple’s relationship. From saving time to spicing up a regular routine, the benefits are numerous. So grab your significant other, hit the gym and get ready to reap the rewards.

Two birds, one stone.

Of all the reasons to work out with your partner, this one is probably the most pragmatic. Ask the average person why they skip the gym, and you’ll typically get an answer that has something to do with time — or lack thereof. We all know fitness should be a priority, but when you’re working overtime and dealing with social and family obligations, something has to give.

If your schedule is overwhelming, make time with your significant other work a little harder (literally). Catch up on your day over a brisk jog around the neighborhood. Plan vacation details while knocking out a strength circuit in the weight room. Sign up for a yoga class together and simply enjoy each other’s company in meditative silence. By making date night pull double duty, you won’t have to feel guilty about skipping the gym for couple time, or vice versa.

It’s a healthy alternative to the typical date night.

Dinner and movie. Drinks and a show. Takeout and Netflix. These typical date-night activities have a couple of things in common: calories and sitting. Sure, it’s fun to indulge every once in a while, and there’s something really great about a lazy Friday night on the couch. But the "sitting plus food" formula doesn’t need to be your date-night default — beyond the negative health and fitness implications, it also gets a little boring. 

An active date, whether it’s a group fitness class, a partner workout in the park or a game of tennis, will leave both you and your partner feeling accomplished and energized (versus tired and bloated).

You get to show off a little.

Health and improved quality of life are the ultimate rewards for regular exercise. But toned arms and an impressive one-rep max on your squat certainly doesn’t hurt. No one wants to be that guy at the gym who shamelessly flexes in the mirror or posts a selfie after every workout, but it’s nice to get a little attention for all the work you put in. Your partner is the perfect candidate to give you said attention.

Brag, gloat and showboat all you want without feeling like a creep because you can return the favor by complimenting your partner’s perfect form and muscle definition. Everybody wins.

You’ll improve your chances of meeting your fitness goals.

A recent longitudinal study found that men and women were more likely to change or improve unhealthy behaviors like smoking, physical inactivity and excessive alcohol consumption if their partner joined them. Peer pressure gets a bad rap, but it has its good points. It’s a lot tougher to bail on an early-morning training session if someone is next to you dragging himself or herself out of bed. Pairing up on workouts provides support and a healthy dose of accountability.

You’ll improve your chances as a couple.

You’ve heard the saying "Couples who play together stay together." And, really, what is exercise if not organized play time for adults? Trainers and fitness junkies credit everything from the boost of exercise-induced endorphins to the sweaty palms and racing hearts we associate with lust to their success. But, no matter the reason, it’s worth you and your partner’s time to test the theory for yourselves. 

Are you a couple that wants to live the fit lifestyle? Join the America's Fittest Couple Challenge and land the cover of M&P! For more details visit muscleandperformance.com/fitcouples.



About the Author

Jenessa Connor

Jenessa Connor is a freelance writer and NASM Personal Trainer. She’s a proud member of CrossFit 718 in Brooklyn, New York. When she’s not at the box, she’s playing Scrabble with her husband and two cats. (They help judge challenges.) You can read her blog at

www.jenessaconnor.com.